Sunday, 8 May 2011

Curiosity Cabinet #8—Scotsmac


For this Curiosity Cabinet I shall look at something that truly is curious, it's called Scotsmac. It's not so curious because of the taste but more because of what it says it is and what it looks like it is.

Scotsmac is described as a blend of Mature British Wine and Fine Whiskey but the label certainly suggest something else, here is an annotated version.



So there is lots pointing to this being Scottish and it could be a blend of British Wine and Scotch Whisky (as the label would seem to imply)—but as the word "whiskey" on the label contains an "e" it can't have anything to do with it, as all Scotch Whisky is spelt without an "e".*

Scotsmac is bottled at 15%ABV. What does it taste like?

Despite my ranting about the label I don't think Scotsmac tastes too bad. It's a bit syrupy, but vanilla oaky elements come through as does a honey/maple-syrup quality, almost as if you should pour it over ice cream. Like a whisky, I prefer it at room temperature, as I find adding ice makes it a bit bitter.

If you approach this as a whisk(e)y of any form you will be disappointed but if you look at it as a whisky liqueur you may be pleasantly surprised and at under £5 for 70cl it's not bad value either.

* In addition to Scotch, it also seems that Japanese, Indian, Swedish, South African, Australian, New Zealand, French, English, Welsh, Canadian and Dutch whisky is all spelt without the "e", whereas American and Irish whiskey include the "e".

11 comments:

  1. Interesting. Looks from the photo like it has a bit of a head to it as well. So where is this ambrosia manufactured? Cheers!

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  2. Canadian whisky does not in fact have an "e"! Just double checked on a bottle.

    The rule of thumb I'd always learned was that if there's an "e" in the name of the country there's one in the whisk(e)y from there, although the rest of your list seems to disprove that.

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  3. Quite right, not sure why I wrote that! There is only one Welsh and one English Whisky that I know of, so I guess they decided on the spelling. I'd guess the lack of 'e' is to draw a comparison with Scotch.

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  4. I just purchased a bottle of this fine licker, and there's no longer an 'e' in 'whisky' on the label. They must've spotted and corrected that particular error.

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  5. i too have a bottle right here and it doesnt have an 'e'

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  6. This is an original bottle of Scotsmac as sold by Jimmy Wham. It was then relaunched by Charles Kinloch & Sonsin the early 1970 's and became a huge success for them. Known as Wham's dram it was one of the first volume brands advertised on television and opened up the grocery or supermarket trade for wines & spirits

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  7. I discovered this tipple when hiking through leeds as a student. A very good companion to a woodland walk as it flavour compliments cheap hash. I later found that adding lemonade as a mixer extends it's life and makes it less syrupy. The drunk you acquire whilst consuming this stuff is of the tasmanian devil caliber.
    I highly recommend it as a music festival rucksack filler and a final resort during dawn at teh end of a free party.
    Good stuff.

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  8. WHAT A WEIRD COMBINATION?! I discovered this drink when searching through the remaining bottles of alcohol in my student house. I have a cold and cannot taste it, but can feel the effects. Prior to this I had 2 Kopperburg ciders (not exactly the strongest of drinks) and felt 0 effects. However after a few sips of Scotsmac I feel GREAT. I never even comment on websites, but this drink needs to be commented on!

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  9. lol ahm scottish cheap way tae get pished

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  10. I was in high school. My brother in college. We got on a Scotsmac kick with some of our friends around the late 70's / early 80's. It wasn't that bad at all -- unless you drank waaaaaay too much of it -- which resulted in puke covered shoes and a two day hangover. LOL. The Wham's Dram. I remember it being darker in color but who knows.

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